Having Fun Right Now

Another Family Planning to Travel the World!

Category: History

History of Global Living Conditions

A very interesting and must read article titled “The short history of global living conditions and why it matters that we know it” by Max Roser that answers the question, “All things considered, do you think the world is getting better or worse, or neither getting better nor worse?” by looking at the history of global living conditions.

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Travel Idea: Shakespeare

With the celebration of the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death last week there was quite a bit of talk about the bard.

I came across this link of “Pubs That Shakespeare Actually Drank At” list and wanted to bookmark it for future reference, cuz you know, beer:

 

The George Inn, London – An Elizabethan inn-yard theatre, burned down and rebuilt in 1677, National Trust site
The Bell Inn, Welford on Avon, Warwickshire – Open fireplaces!
The Windmill, Stratford-upon-Avon –2 minute walk from Will’s house, built in 1599.
Shakespeare’s Tree, Bidford-on-Avon, Warwickshire – This is evidently a tree that the great bard, um, passed out under. Good to know!
The George Inn

Germs & Genes

I’ve just finished a course on the History of Science and wanted to share some neat resources:

Philip Ziegler’s The Black Death is a fascinating read about the spread of the bubonic plague throughout medieval Europe. Thoroughly gross (pus, pus, and more pus) and decidedly depressing (“Let’s blame the plague on the Jews, round them up and slaughter them!”), it is also useful for increasing the amount of trivia you have at the ready to gross out your friends and family. For example, to prevent contracting the plague just hang out around latrines and breathe in the fumes, it worked (not really) for the Europeans!

Ziegler

Continue this theme with a rousing game of Pandemic and feel completely paranoid and compelled to wash your hands repeatedly.

I was also fascinated by this great video by CGP Grey on the importance of the environment on the spread of disease:

I also wrote a paper on the controversy surrounding Watson & Crick’s Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the structure of DNA. Check out Watson’s “memoir” The Double Helix.  It is a quick and entertaining read, albeit rife with sexism. Sexism you say? Hoho! If Watson isn’t busy playing tennis or going to cocktail parties, he is criticizing Rosalind Franklin’s looks and dismissing her brilliance. Franklin was one of the many scientists that Watson & Crick took advantage of in their personal race for Nobel glories. Check out Brenda Maddox’s book on Franklin to learn more.

The Loxelys and the War of 1812

I found the graphic novel The Loxelys and the War of 1812 by chance on one of my first trips to the public library. We have recently moved to the Niagara region and I have to admit that my memory of the War of 1812 and its impact on this region is pretty foggy.

This graphic novel is appropriate for children who can deal with issues related to war. It is a great resource for learning about the impact of the war on more than just soldiers. For example, the narrative follows the experience of women and native peoples as well.

You can see an animation of the novel here and a trailer for the book below:

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